Retreats

Retreats 2017-06-26T14:49:40+00:00

Retreat Program and Kairos

Memorial’s four-year retreat program promotes a deeper awareness of God in students’ daily lives, fosters a greater sense of community and calls students to put their faith into action in the school and the community. These retreats establish a supportive and non-judgmental environment in which students have the chance to question and grow in their spirituality. The Memorial retreat program culminates in the KAIROS experience, open to juniors and seniors. During this special retreat, students are given a chance to reflect on their lives, connect with others, and explore relationships among family, friends and God. Memorial’s retreat program offers students an opportunity to gain a better understanding of themselves and their relationship with God.

Memorial’s retreat program seeks to bring about awareness of God in daily life, to foster a community united by common faith and practice and to manifest the relevance of faith in all aspects of our existence. The program’s welcoming atmosphere is conducive to spiritual development, giving students the freedom and confidence to question life’s meaning and grow into that meaning by experiencing God’s grace. Retreat activities include community faith sharing and individual reflection designed to deepen the bond of Christian love between individuals and strengthen the individual’s faith in God.

NOTE: NEW DATES FOR 2015-16 NEEDED

Dates Retreat  Length  Fee
Aug. 27 Freshmen Mandatory Day Retreat $45
Feb. 8-9 Sophomores Two days, one night $80
Sept. 21-22 Juniors Two days, one night $95
Nov. 27-30 KAIROS Four days, three nights $225
Apr. 17-20 KAIROS Four days, three nights $225

 

NOTE: Grants are available from Campus Ministry to help offset any retreat fee for families receiving tuition assistance.  The fee for the mandatory freshmen retreat is charged to the tuition account.

Retreats

All are required to attend the all-day retreat for their retreat orientation. Sophomores, juniors and seniors are not required to attend a retreat. However, retreats are considered an essential piece of the spiritual and communal growth of our student body and thus students are encouraged to participate in these invaluable experiences.  San Joaquin Memorial High School must submit non-refundable deposits for bus transportation and facility rental to these designated facilities. The school’s financial obligations do not change when students are unable to attend due to suspension, dismissal, poor grades or behavior and/or other unforeseen circumstances.

Requests for refunds, for any reason, must be made in writing and will be subject to refusal or reduction due to the deposits incurred by Memorial. Please contact the Campus Minister with questions.

As the current retreat program evolves, changes will be made to meet our goals for future Panthers. Please stay connected to see how we are growing. For more specific information regarding retreats, please contact Clarissa Myers at cmyers@sjmhs.org or by phone at ext.143.

Kairos

The Kairos Retreat program was established in 1965 and was later adopted by schools and parishes across the country and internationally. Kairos grew out of the Cursillo retreat (an adult retreat movement) and was adapted for teenagers by a group of priests and brothers under the direction of Rev. Douglas L. Vrown in the Diocese of Brooklyn, New York.

Retreat experiences allow the individual to withdraw from the day-to-day regimen that distracts from hearing the voice of God in life. To become more connected to God, one must seek an element of solitude and reflection outside of their normal routine. Kairos seeks to accomplish these by removing the participant from their daily grind and immersing them in an environment encouraging self reflection, spiritual sojourn and communal experience – mass, if you will, for a four-day, three-night retreat.

The word Kairos is an ancient Greek word that means the right or opportune moment (the supreme moment). It is in the “supreme moment,” when our souls are quiet enough and our hearts open enough, that we are able to hear God’s voice. Since introduced to retreat culture, it has also been described as “God’s Time,” where the focus of the participant is not on the hours in the day, but the experience that is before them at that moment.

The Kairos retreat is an experience of Christian community with a series of talks given by a team of youth and adults; other elements include prayer, mass, reconciliation, worship music and other prayerful experiences offered by the team. The participants (retreatants) are engaged in a variety of activities and discussions throughout the retreat and full participation is key to having a meaningful experience. The concluding challenge of Kairos is to continue applying the principles and attitudes toward living out faith once returning home; being encouraged to get actively involved in “Living the 4th” at their school and/or parish.